Tag Archives: video

Marcia! Marcia! Marcia! John McCain as Jan Brady

John McCain sounds like the whiny high school kid that’s bitter that he isn’t the one invited to sit at the cool kids’ table during lunch.  Or Jan Brady.

First he cries “Barack is such a big shot celebrity”, which is hilarious because the messiah of the Republican Party is Hollywood actor Ronald Reagan, a man who had political success because of celebrity. One of McCain’s biggest supporters is California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, a guy whose sole reason for holding office is his celebrity. Additionally, McCain called himself a celebrity, a mention that has since been erased from McCain’s campaign website:

The 2006 midterm campaign had just ended when McCain took the first formal step toward a presidential run in November. He formed an exploratory committee and gave a speech casting himself as a “common-sense conservative” in the vein of Ronald Reagan who could lead the party back to dominance after a dreadful election season by returning to the GOP’s core principles.

political celebrity, McCain is considered a top contender for the nomination.

It’s like the Republicans who eat this meme up are tragically oblivious to the irony. Or mentally handicapped. 

Then, to further channel Jan Brady (Jan McCain?), McCain comes out with his Moses ad. Lets’ ignore the fact that John McCain probably still has smear ads from his own campaign against Moses, it’s interesting that McCain chose to compare Obama to a leader people actually liked and has a strong record of leadership and accomplishment. Juxtapose Moses with Bush, and I vote Moses every single time (although, I hope Moses will respect people’s Constitutional right to worship a Golden Calf).

What’s so bad about popularity? I mean, isn’t the whole point of democracy to install leaders who win the most popularity contests? God forbid America have a President that is popular and actually liked! And it’s not like John McCain or his GOP supporters would reject such popularity if it was visited upon him instead of Obama; John McCain would do anything to win.

John McCain is Jan Brady, the ugly step sister, and the high school kid that’s bitter because he can’t sit at the cool lunch table;  but, if he had the chance to trade places and be the Home Coming King, he’d sell his own mother to get there.

Poor Johnny 😦 You had your time as a “political celebrity”; don’t hate – everyone gets old.  There’s always someone prettier chasing behind or a better athlete that comes through and breaks your school records. This whining is very unbecoming of a macho war hero. So sad.

Song of the Week – “Paper Planes” by M.I.A.

British (by way of Sri Lanka) hip hop artist M.I.A. rhymes over a beat flipped by DJ Diplo from The Clash’s Straight to Hell to create Paper Planes. Straight to Hell is a classic riff and M.I.A’s Caribbean feel gels nicely with Strummer and Jones’s groove. 

Also check Diplo’s treatment of Marlena Shaw’s fantastic California Soul.

Obama Quest

All week long we’ve been following ‘Barry Magicseed’s Summer Abroad’.

That’s how Jon Stewart introduced a brilliant Daily Show Thursday night, which was followed by a hilarious mashup of our heroic Senator slaying seven-headed dragons and a cyclops from that old-school Sinbad movie that used to constantly play on UHF TV.

In Part 2, CNN’s Wolf Blitzer asks, “Is the mainstream media in love with Barack Obama?” Stewart answers that question more effectively, and more humorously, than the videos attempted by the McCain campaign.

I post this today because this is one of the funniest Daily Shows I’ve seen in a while I think there’s a laugh in there for everyone, even Republicans.

It’s worth just watching the Sinbad intro and the first 1:20 of jokes. Perhaps the GOP should just pay liberal comedians a boatload of cash to write humorous material attacking the left, since it’s obvious that no one satirizes the left better than the left?

(Stupid WordPress doesn’t allow Daily Show embeds, so you’ll just have to follow the links)

[ Part 1 ] [ Part 2 ]

The third segment with Senior Black Correspondent Larry Wilmore was funny as well.

Notes from the Underground

Here’s a round up of links I wanted to do full posts on, but don’t have time.

1.) Neurogenesis: your body creates new brain cells. Aerobic exercise increases neurogenesis and helps fight mental illnesses (like depression), senility, and Alzheimer’s.

But something else happened as a result of all those workouts: blood flowed at a much higher volume to a part of the brain responsible for neurogenesis. Functional M.R.I.’s showed that a portion of each person’s hippocampus received almost twice the blood volume as it did before. Scientists suspect that the blood pumping into that part of the brain was helping to produce fresh neurons.

The hippocampus plays a large role in how mammals create and process memories; it also plays a role in cognition. If your hippocampus is damaged, you most likely have trouble learning facts and forming new memories. Age plays a factor, too. As you get older, your brain gets smaller, and one of the areas most prone to this shrinkage is the hippocampus. (This can start depressingly early, in your 30’s.) Many neurologists believe that the loss of neurons in the hippocampus may be a primary cause of the cognitive decay associated with aging. A number of studies have shown that people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia tend to have smaller-than-normal hippocampi. The Columbia study suggests that shrinkage to parts of the hippocampus can be slowed via exercise.

2.) I don’t agree with Obama regarding his new call to expand federal aid to faith-based programs, but at least read what he said and don’t rely on media reports:

Now, make no mistake, as someone who used to teach constitutional law, I believe deeply in the separation of church and state, but I don’t believe this partnership will endanger that idea – so long as we follow a few basic principles. First, if you get a federal grant, you can’t use that grant money to proselytize to the people you help and you can’t discriminate against them – or against the people you hire – on the basis of their religion. Second, federal dollars that go directly to churches, temples, and mosques can only be used on secular programs. And we’ll also ensure that taxpayer dollars only go to those programs that actually work.

That doesn’t mean that the federal funds can’t be used to free up other money that will be used on discriminatory and proselytizing activities.

3.) Hitchens get’s waterboarded – Is this the Christian fundie wet dream, or are they dissapointed that Dawkins and Harris weren’t tortured as well? Hitchens has been unappolagetic pro-war and a proponent of waterboarding. Now he says, “believe me, it’s torture”.

4.) This MTV Choose or Loose election commercial is funny.

5.) A Christian “news” service changes Olympian Tyson Gay’s name to “Tyson Homosexual”. Ha! Fundies say the darndest things!

6.) Two years out and people still express “disgust” and “outrage” over New Orleans Katrina looters (see this famous pic). Why doesn’t anyone talk about the racist vigilantes? Watch this clip from the excellent Danish documentary Welcome to New Orleans. (Watch the complete film, a story of how self reliance and private citizen volunteerism filled a need medical care needs despite the government’s efforts to stop it, @ Google Vide0.)

Moyers Discusses the Myth of Black Emancipation [w/video]

The enslavement of Black Americans did not end on June 19, 1865; it continued until World War II.

In his March speech on race, Barack Obama said:

[W]e do need to remind ourselves that so many of the disparities that exist in the African-American community today can be directly traced to inequalities passed on from an earlier generation that suffered under the brutal legacy of slavery and Jim Crow….

Legalized discrimination – where blacks were prevented, often through violence, from owning property, or loans were not granted to African-American business owners, or black homeowners could not access FHA mortgages, or blacks were excluded from unions, or the police force, or fire departments – meant that black families could not amass any meaningful wealth to bequeath to future generations. That history helps explain the wealth and income gap between black and white, and the concentrated pockets of poverty that persists in so many of today’s urban and rural communities.

A new book from Wall Street Journal reporter Douglas Blackmon explodes “that history” referenced by Obama and deepens modern understanding of Jim Crow and the Black Codes in Slavery By Another Name – The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II.

The book’s website explains:

Under laws enacted specifically to intimidate blacks, tens of thousands of African Americans were arbitrarily arrested, hit with outrageous fines, and charged for the costs of their own arrests. With no means to pay these ostensible “debts,” prisoners were sold as forced laborers to coal mines, lumber camps, brickyards, railroads, quarries and farm plantations. Thousands of other African Americans were simply seized by southern landowners and compelled into years of involuntary servitude. Government officials leased falsely imprisoned blacks to small-town entrepreneurs, provincial farmers, and dozens of corporations—including U.S. Steel Corp.—looking for cheap and abundant labor. Armies of “free” black men labored without compensation, were repeatedly bought and sold, and were forced through beatings and physical torture to do the bidding of white masters for decades after the official abolition of American slavery.

The neoslavery system exploited legal loopholes and federal policies which discouraged prosecution of whites for continuing to hold black workers against their wills. As it poured millions of dollars into southern government treasuries, the new slavery also became a key instrument in the terrorization of African Americans seeking full participation in the U.S. political system.

Bill Moyers talked with Blackmon on a recent episode of Bill Moyers’ Journal (watch an excerpted clip below the flip or the whole interview at PBS where you can also read the transcript): Continue reading

Stimulus Check: So I can buy more gas. So I can get myself to work….

Anyone remember this 80s PSA about cocaine?

“I do coke. So I can work longer. So I can earn more. So I can…do more coke.” Ok, so substitute coke with gasoline: “I got my stimulus check. So I can finally afford gas. So I can get myeslef to work. So I can earn more. So I can buy more gas. So I can get myself to work…”

The folks in Washington are just common street pushers. But instead of coke, they push gas and they bribe us to buy it at $4.00 a gallon. Mission Accomplished. Thanks, W!

MLK: James Brown “Saved” Boston

Martin Luther King was assasinated on April 4, 1968. By April 5, riots were tearing apart major American cities. Not Boston.

Mayor Kevin White** engineered a a deal that allowed Brown to perform and the legendary local PBS station to carry the show live. Everyone stayed home. Brown’s concert has been local legend for years, and now with the 40th anniversery of King’s death, VH1 has produced a rockDoc on the Boston show.

The Boston Phoenix calls this the greatest concert in Boston history:

On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, America’s greatest civil-rights leader, was assassinated in Memphis. Violence erupted in major cities across the county as African-Americans, who had already endured so much, reacted to the loss of a leader who was both spiritual and practical. Mayor Kevin White panicked. Although Boston wasn’t literally burning, like Detroit or Los Angeles, it was approaching an ignition point. He considered canceling all public events, including a James Brown concert at the Garden. Fortunately, his advisers suggested that stopping the show would be viewed as yet another stifling of black expression and could easily start the very rioting they’d hoped to avoid. The mayor made history by meeting with Brown and asking if they could work together to keep the peace. He was less lucky with the local affiliates of the three major TV networks, who all declined to broadcast the show, according to music historian Dick Waterman. Instead, the PBS station, WGBH, stepped in so Brown’s music could reach beyond the Garden’s 14,000 seats and into the living rooms of everyone in Greater Boston. The show was an absolute tour de force. Brown soothed his mourning audience by dedicating the concert to Dr. King and delivering a million-watt performance packed with greats: “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World,” “Cold Sweat,” “That’s Life,” “Try Me,” “Please, Please, Please,” and more. He invited White to speak to the crowd and the cameras. And when police reacted to fans who rushed the stage at one point, Brown assured them he could handle things himself, pleading, successfully, for everyone to return to their seats. On this night, music literally helped determine the course of Boston’s history. Continue reading